Scientific Basis for Muscle Testing

Scientific basis for muscle testing
My last post on muscle testing challenged a few people. There are so many different medical discoveries that it is not possible for everyone to know all of them. Most doctors are so busy with their practices; it is difficult for them to keep pace, let alone the average consumer. Plus there is a preponderance of “news” being the information or product which is most advertised. Heavily advertised products are backed by companies with big budgets, not necessarily the products which are best for your body.  This applies to soft drinks or prescriptions. Advertising does not guarantee better performance or health for the consumer.

So that leaves a lot of great nutritional items, foods, and new information wallowing along the roadside. Unless someone picks it up and champions it, valuable information is lost. The Delta Institute champions several things: energy healing, muscle testing, proper nutrition through natural foods and supplements and having an open mind to new discoveries.

Muscle testing, or applied kinesiology, was developed in 1964 by Dr. George Goodheart, a chiropractor. As of 2003, it is the 10th most frequently used chiropractic technique in the United States. In 1991, 37% of 4,835 full-time American chiropractors who responded to a survey by the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) said they used AK in their practice [1]. Subsequent NBCE surveys found percentages of 31% in Canada (1992) [2], 60% in Australia (1993) [3], 72% in New Zealand (1993) [3], 43% in the United States (1998) [4].  In addition to chiropractors, the following professionals also use it: naturopaths, medical doctors, dentists, nutritionists, physical therapists, veterinarians, massage therapists, nurse practitioners and energy healers. There are no statistics available for these other professions.

There have been clinical studies on muscle testing with widely varying results. The majority of studies have focused on diagnosing diseases using muscle testing. No known studies have been conducted using muscle testing to assist in identifying buried or attached emotions. In my practice, clients often state they feel “down”, yet they are unable to articulate exact emotions for how they feel. Since the Emotional Freedom Technique relies on knowing specific emotions, muscle testing is used to get feedback from the body on what emotions are present which the body feels to be important. Nine times out of ten, when a specific emotion is indicated and I ask the client if they know what it relates to; they will immediately tell me about the event associated with that emotion.  It was there all the time, they just couldn’t articulate it.

I also use muscle testing to help people identify possible allergens. These can include foods, soaps, fabrics, perfumes and other materials they come in contact with.  The idea is to narrow down the range of what might be causing certain problems. Muscle testing might identify 3 or 4 foods which the client is testing as being allergic to. I will then ask the client to stop eating those foods for 2 weeks and get tested again after the food is out of their system. The second test may show an allergy to only one of those foods.  Through the use of muscle testing, we were able to narrow down and test possible allergens.

Is muscle testing 100% accurate? No, but neither is any other diagnostic test. I use muscle testing to narrow the range of possibilities for the cause of a problem. So instead of an entire universe of possible issues, the muscle testing will narrow it down to just a few emotions or foods.  Muscle testing can narrow down the possible causes, so if needed, a referral for more direct tests can be made.

References
[1] Christenson MG, Morgan DRD. Job Analysis of Chiropractic: A Report, Survey Analysis, and Summary of the Practice of Chiropractic within the United States. Greeley, CO: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 1993.
[2] Christenson MG, Morgan DRD. Job Analysis of Chiropractic in Canada: A Report, Survey Analysis, and Summary of the Practice of Chiropractic within Canada. Greeley, CO: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 1993.
[3] Christenson MG, Morgan DRD. Job Analysis of Chiropractic in Australia and New Zealand: A Report, Survey Analysis, and Summary of the Practice of Chiropractic within Australia and New Zealand. Greeley, CO: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 1994.
[4] Christenson MG and others. Job Analysis of Chiropractic: A Project Report, Survey Analysis, and Summary of the Practice of Chiropractic within the United States. Greeley, CO: National Board of Chiropractic Examiners, 2000.

Diana Sturm, Ph.D., Executive Director of The Delta Institute in Mobile, Alabama, is a scientist, spiritual adviser and Certified Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) practitioner. Using EFT, she helps clients release a wide variety of negative emotions in the comforting atmosphere of her private office. She also promotes healthy living using natural techniques including earthing, essential oils and meditation. She is a rising star member of Young Living.  Dr. Sturm has appeared as a featured guest speaker for various civic groups and on the radio. Call Dr. Sturm today to schedule an appointment (251) 219-4574.

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